The First iPhone Music Instrument: Ocarina

Smule, the people that invented the Sonic lighter application for the iPhone, step it up a notch with Ocarina, the first networked music instrument for the iPhone.

For only $0.99 cents, you  will be able to enjoy two major features with the Ocarina app:

1) Play music on your phone by clicking on a set of circles on the touch screen or “blowing” into it. The Ocarina app is a modern version of an ancient instrument, believed to be 12, 000 years old.  It is sensitive to your breath, touch and movements.

2) Listen to Ocarina songs being played by iPhone holders around the globe, in real time, through a world map interface bleeping with green dots that represent active Ocarinas.  Though there are levels of expertise, you can easily skip the bad players by hitting next.

The developers of the Ocarina app are all academics at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).

Great job in making an app not only useful, but viral. More on this app on TC.

Watch the demo:

Eze Vidra
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Eze Vidra

Chief Innovation Officer at Antidote
Eze is the Chief Innovation Officer at Antidote, a startup helping patients search and match to clinical trial, to accelerate medical breakthroughs. Previously, Ezewas a General Partner at Google Ventures Europe. Before GV, Eze founded and led Campus London, Google's first physical hub for startups, and was the Head Google for Entrepreneurs in Europe. He's an experienced product manager and startup mentor. In 2012 Eze founded Techbikers, a non-for profit supporting children education in developing countries.
Eze Vidra
Follow me

Eze Vidra

Eze is the Chief Innovation Officer at Antidote, a startup helping patients search and match to clinical trial, to accelerate medical breakthroughs. Previously, Eze was a General Partner at Google Ventures Europe. Before GV, Eze founded and led Campus London, Google’s first physical hub for startups, and was the Head Google for Entrepreneurs in Europe. He’s an experienced product manager and startup mentor. In 2012 Eze founded Techbikers, a non-for profit supporting children education in developing countries.